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Anonymous asked:

The doctor will never be a woman. There are plenty of women in the show that are admirable role models. I think you're just full ofsh it. Stop pushing your american views onto Doctor Who, a BRITISH show, with BRITISH values. It's unbelievable how obnoxious and hypocritical feminists are, especially you third-wave feminists. Always spouting "equal rights" but, "Can't hit me, cause I'm a girl!" You probably won't respond to this because you know I'm right and the whovianfeminism stance is weak.

whovianfeminism:

This was so beautiful that I had to put it up on my wall and examine it as if it were an exquisite piece of art. 

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"Manpain" by Anonymous

Above we have a quintessential example of early 21st Century prose by an aggrieved man. The author of this piece is unknown, but we can surmise by his inability to properly say “shit” to a woman and his assurance that he likes “admirable” female characters that he is most likely a “Nice Guy.”

The anonymous author employs deliberate obtuseness in order to provoke a reaction from his audience. Notice how he pretends no British individual supports the idea of a woman portraying the Doctor, despite clear evidence to the contrary, even amongst actors who have portrayed the titular character on the show. Then there is the stunning self-centeredness regarding his perception of third wave feminism; he is only interested in equality it grants him the “right” to hit the women whose arguments make him so incoherently angry that he is unable to rationally reply.

His final challenge attempts to trap the reader. Do we respond and grant him the audience and validation he so desperately seeks, or do we ignore him and let him believe he has won? But perhaps we have a third option: to turn the focus back on him and examine how his comments display his deep insecurity in his own sense of masculinity, something he feels can only be reclaimed by challenging a girl on the internet to a fight and preemptively declaring victory because he fears he cannot engage with her on an intellectual level.

Anonymous

Anonymous asked:

honestly curious, why does it offend you?

alexsummres:

i see lucy as a racist film that plays on negative stereotypes while hiding behind the cover of (white) feminism. 

all this film has done is switch out the white man for a white woman. it’s still a film about a white person getting violated by the evil poc, then gaining power and wiping them out. 

here’s 2 of my favourite scenes from the trailer: 

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from top to left to right:

KEEP CLEAN 保持清潔,APPLE 蘋果,ONION 洋蔥,GRAPE 葡萄,CHAIR 椅子 EDIT: sorry it says ORANGE 橘子,TOMATO 番茄

traditional chinese is an actual written language used by millions of people, not symbols to be thrown around at the whim of set designers because they look cool and idk, serves to create a menacing asian atmosphere. this is so disrespectful, and made even worse by the fact that this film in set it taipei, taiwan where the official written language is traditional chinese.

it doesn’t matter that this film caters to a primarily “white” audience who won’t be able to read it, the language and culture of taiwan isn’t something for you to twist and use as you deem fit because it’s “exotic.” 

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lucy shoots a guy for not being able to speak english. 

she l i t e r a l l y shoots this taiwanese taxi driver, in taiwan for not being able to speak english. she’s in taipei and she’s shooting people as they are of no use to her because they don’t speak english. 

just think about the sort of message that’s sending out. she’s not being “bad-ass strong female character who takes no shit,” she’s saying that english is useful and better. this is the type of harmful ideology that stretches all the way back from when western countries were colonising and forcing their language and customs on other countries. 

let me explain with a real life example. i was born in new zealand to two taiwanese parents. i am fluent in english, but mandarin is conversational at best. my friends in taiwan say that i am “so lucky” to speak fluent english, when they are fluent in mandarin and their english level is no worse than my mandarin. they tell me that they want to perfect their english but in the same breath tell me that mandarin isn’t worth perfecting because i have english and that’s “enough”. they also tell me how pretty my white friends are when they see pictures.

this is the type of neo imperialism ideology that they’ve grown up buying into. it honestly hurts and frustrates me that they belittle their own culture like this, honestly believing that the western world is superior. this is the type of neo imperialism ideology that this film (hopefully unintentionally) promotes: white people are better and will save the day. 

if they wanted to film a movie about a white women getting back at those who had violated her, why not film it in a western country? if they wanted to film it in taiwan, why not find an asian lead actress?

i do agree that we need more women protagonists in action/superhero movies, but not like this. its not okay that the female lead needs to be kidnapped and have her body cut open without her consent in order to gain her powers, and those said those powers do not make any of this racist bullshit okay. 

i am just so tired and angry of poc always being brushed off to the side as either props or villains in mainstream media. 

as a poc, it’s so frustrating to see that the of the standard of beauty still white women when we live in multi-cultural societies and a diverse world. 

feminism is about equality. a film in which poc are presented as evil and inferior before being killed off by a superior white woman does not promote equality. 

sonofbaldwin:

These are some of the ways white solidarity in regard to fighting against anti-black racism can appear.

These are some ways in which white people can be comrades to black people.

Neither of these individuals are running around saying, “Look at me! Look at how I’m so excellent at being a good white person!” Neither of them said, “Hey! But not all white people…!” They, in fact, said, “Too many white people…!” and got to work. Neither of them has to convince black people of their intentions. What they did was say, “How can I be of service?” and, when told, did as they were asked. They were not there to condescend to black people or speak over black people or pretend to be able to know what it must be like to be black in America. They were there to support the cause, which they recognized as imperative for our liberation and their own.

They put themselves in harm’s way (and when you are allied with black people in a bold and physical way, you have definitely, automatically placed yourself in harm’s way by your mere proximity to black bodies and causes, because the System’s aim is not always true) not because it wins them a gold star for the White Ally Games, but because they know that injustice anywhere is injustice everywhere and whatever evils are perpetrated against black peoples, it’s only a matter of time before those same evils are perpetrated against non-black peoples.

In other words, they are not, to paraphrase James Baldwin, Liberals; that is to say, they aren’t missionaries placing themselves in the mix to feel good about themselves. They know, as much as we do, that Whiteness must be abolished. They are not oblivious to their own privileges, showing up in name only in order to score political correctness points. They, rather, understand that the duty to fight against anti-black racism is the duty of anyone who wishes to think of themselves as an actual human being; who, in fact, understands what “humanity” actually means.

Let these two individuals be some sort of examples to the folks who insist upon “Not all white people…!”

Being a comrade is an action. It is not going around touting your role as The Exception. It is not seeking balms and cookies from black people for being in touch with your BASIC, BASELINE humanity.

If you think it is, you’ve been doing this shit ALL WRONG.

If you have to say “Not all white people…!” if you feel compelled to protect and absolve Whiteness in any way, particularly during an event in which Blackness is being annihilated by Whiteness, your priorities have been made clear. You are not comrade; you are enemy.


[Photo descriptions: A young white man is standing on the grass in the midst of an outdoor, daytime gathering where many individuals, black and white, have shown up. He is holding a sign that says: BLACK LIVES MATTER MIKE BROWN

A white woman is standing alone on the grass. She is holding a white sign with black letters that reads: “I Shoplifted as a teen. How many times should I be shot? #MikeBrown. She added, in the photo’s description, an additional bit of text:

“I want to be clear, the purpose of this photo is NOT to infer guilt on Mike Brown. But too often in the killing of black people by cops, alleged guilt of a minor crime is all that is needed for the white public to write them off. I want to circumvent that entire derailment technique, because in the end, it doesn’t matter. If I get caught shoplifting, I don’t get shot eight times. And Michael Brown shouldn’t have, either.”]

juliedillon:

This is an illustration I did for the August 2014 issue of Popular Science Magazine. The assignment was to show a scifi take on human aging in the future. I wanted to do something relatively positive, so I drew a lady whose life has been been prolonged through cybernetic enhancements and augmentation, so she gets to spend time with her great-great-great-great grandchildren. 

Thanks to AD Michelle Mruk!

vaganja:

aprill-showers:

My brand is finally here!! I make art and apparel designed to celebrate, empower, and uplift women of color from all walks of life. Please help support my movement. Tell all your friends, tell them to tell their friends!! Help me share it with the world, we deserve to take up space, and be loved and celebrated everyday!! Shop here.
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vaganja:

aprill-showers:

My brand is finally here!! I make art and apparel designed to celebrate, empower, and uplift women of color from all walks of life. Please help support my movement. Tell all your friends, tell them to tell their friends!! Help me share it with the world, we deserve to take up space, and be loved and celebrated everyday!! Shop here.
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vaganja:

aprill-showers:

My brand is finally here!! I make art and apparel designed to celebrate, empower, and uplift women of color from all walks of life. Please help support my movement. Tell all your friends, tell them to tell their friends!! Help me share it with the world, we deserve to take up space, and be loved and celebrated everyday!! Shop here.
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vaganja:

aprill-showers:

My brand is finally here!! I make art and apparel designed to celebrate, empower, and uplift women of color from all walks of life. Please help support my movement. Tell all your friends, tell them to tell their friends!! Help me share it with the world, we deserve to take up space, and be loved and celebrated everyday!! Shop here.
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vaganja:

aprill-showers:

My brand is finally here!! I make art and apparel designed to celebrate, empower, and uplift women of color from all walks of life. Please help support my movement. Tell all your friends, tell them to tell their friends!! Help me share it with the world, we deserve to take up space, and be loved and celebrated everyday!! Shop here.
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vaganja:

aprill-showers:

My brand is finally here!! I make art and apparel designed to celebrate, empower, and uplift women of color from all walks of life. Please help support my movement. Tell all your friends, tell them to tell their friends!! Help me share it with the world, we deserve to take up space, and be loved and celebrated everyday!! Shop here.
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vaganja:

aprill-showers:

My brand is finally here!! I make art and apparel designed to celebrate, empower, and uplift women of color from all walks of life. Please help support my movement. Tell all your friends, tell them to tell their friends!! Help me share it with the world, we deserve to take up space, and be loved and celebrated everyday!! Shop here.
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vaganja:

aprill-showers:

My brand is finally here!! I make art and apparel designed to celebrate, empower, and uplift women of color from all walks of life. Please help support my movement. Tell all your friends, tell them to tell their friends!! Help me share it with the world, we deserve to take up space, and be loved and celebrated everyday!! Shop here.
Zoom Info
vaganja:

aprill-showers:

My brand is finally here!! I make art and apparel designed to celebrate, empower, and uplift women of color from all walks of life. Please help support my movement. Tell all your friends, tell them to tell their friends!! Help me share it with the world, we deserve to take up space, and be loved and celebrated everyday!! Shop here.
Zoom Info
vaganja:

aprill-showers:

My brand is finally here!! I make art and apparel designed to celebrate, empower, and uplift women of color from all walks of life. Please help support my movement. Tell all your friends, tell them to tell their friends!! Help me share it with the world, we deserve to take up space, and be loved and celebrated everyday!! Shop here.
Zoom Info

vaganja:

aprill-showers:

My brand is finally here!! I make art and apparel designed to celebrate, empower, and uplift women of color from all walks of life. Please help support my movement. Tell all your friends, tell them to tell their friends!! Help me share it with the world, we deserve to take up space, and be loved and celebrated everyday!! Shop here.

I could talk about the PE teacher in my town who was asked to resign due to his harassment of female students, who was then hired as a school bus driver for a rural route with both primary and high school students. I could talk about how, from the age of seven, I refused to wear skirts or dresses, and from the time I entered high school at 10 to when I moved at 16 I always wore bike shorts or CCC shorts under my dress, because he was not particularly subtle about the way he looked at us – and those bus steps are high. I could talk about how this was common knowledge and was never denied by any authority figure we ever raised it with, but rather we were just kind of brushed off. I could talk about how, sometimes, I was the last person on my bus in the afternoon and I was never quite sure if something bad would happen to me, even though for a long time I probably couldn’t have articulated what it was that I feared.

I could talk about how I spent ten years of my childhood believing it was perfectly normal and acceptable for a seven year old child to stop wearing her favourite clothes because a grown man she relies on to get to and from school from a relatively remote location gets a thrill from looking up her skirt.

I could talk about the art teacher at my high school who used to run his hands up and down our backs, right along the spot where your bra sits. Considering most of us were fairly new to wearing bras in the first place, this was a decidedly uncomfortable experience. I could talk about how he used to get just a little too close for comfort in the supply room. Nothing overt, nothing nameable – just enough to make you drag someone else along with you if you needed a fresh piece of paper or you ran out of ink. I could talk about how the odd comment or complaint that was made was completely handwaved, that we were told to be very careful about what we were saying, that we could get someone in a lot of trouble by “starting those kinds of rumours”, and did we really want to be responsible for that?

I could talk about the first time I was made to feel ashamed of my body, at twelve or thirteen, getting into a water fight with my stepfather and uncle in the height of summer. I could talk about my grandmother completely flipping out, talking about how disgusting it was, how grown men should be ashamed of the way they were behaving with a girl. I could talk about how she then spent the next few hours trying to convince me I was being somehow victimised, while I was mostly confused about what had taken place – it took me a long time to work it out. I could talk about the unvoiced but ever-present fear for months afterwards that my grandma would bring it up again, that she would bring it up in the wrong place or to the wrong people and that my uncle, a schoolteacher, would suffer for it.

I could talk about how that destroyed what had been a fantastic relationship with my uncle, and how, ten years later, he still won’t hug me at Christmas.

I could talk about being called a frigid bitch and a slut in the same breath in high school. I could talk about multiple instances of sitting in a big group of friends, hearing someone trying to get into someone else’s pants, starting off sweet enough but quickly descending into emotional manipulation and thinly veiled abuse. I could talk about the time I went off with someone willingly enough and being followed by someone I considered a friend, someone who would not leave no matter how many times I said “no”, who only went away when the person I was with said that he “didn’t feel like sharing”.

I could talk about the family friend who always made me feel a little bit off for no discernible reason. The one who if I was left alone in the room with him, I would always find an excuse to leave. The one time I expressed this, I was told I was being a drama queen, and that I needed to grow up and stop being so precious, that one day I was going to have to deal with people I didn’t like and I might as well get used to it. I could talk about how he never did anything untoward, never gave me any specific reason to feel unsafe – but years after I last saw him, when he was found guilty of four historical sexual assault charges, one of rape and three of indecent assault on girls under twelve, I was, for reasons I still don’t entirely understand, completely unsurprised.

I could talk about my boyfriend justifying his rape of me with “you could have fought me off if you really wanted you, you slut”. I could talk about how, when I tried to tell people, I was told I was being a nasty, spiteful, vindictive bitch. I could talk about how selfish it was of me to say such things, that he’d overcome such a hard life and was going to go on and make something of himself, who the hell was I to try and stand in his way?

I could talk about how my response to being raped was to sleep with anyone and everyone because I rationalised that if I never said no, then no one could force me. I could talk about how I have been told time and time again, by people who should know better, that this is a sign that I wasn’t really raped at all.

I could talk about how, when I finally worked up the courage to make a formal complaint of sexual harassment against my boss, I was asked why I had let it continue for so long, and what I had done to make him think his behaviour would be welcomed.

I could talk about how when a much later boss got me completely wasted at my leaving party, to the point where I couldn’t walk, and fucked me in a back alley, he waited until I was sober the next morning to tell me that he had a pregnant wife, because he heard through the grapevine that I was very strict about not sleeping with married people or straight women, and he thought I should “learn my place” and realise that I’m “not such a high and mighty bitch with a moral high ground after all”.

I could talk about these things, but I very rarely do. Since I was seven years old, I have been told that my body is not my own, that my consent is not my own, that my feelings of discomfort are not my own. I have taught myself to suppress my gut instinct upon meeting people. I have been taught to smile, to be polite, to suck it up if I feel unsafe. When I complain, I have been told I’m being irrational, oversensitive, and selfish. The underlying message is, how dare I try and ascertain any kind of control over my own body?

I should talk about it. But I don’t actually know whether I can.

An anonymous guest post on The Lady Garden. This is the reality for so many women. #YesAllWomen (via takealookatyourlife)

(Source: youtastelike-sunlight)

bobbycaputo:

Here’s Why We Need to Protect Public Libraries

We live in a “diverse and often fractious country,” writes Robert Dawson, but there are some things that unite us—among them, our love of libraries. “A locally governed and tax-supported system that dispenses knowledge and information for everyone throughout the country at no cost to its patrons is an astonishing thing,” the photographer writes in the introduction to his book, The Public Library: A Photographic Essay. “It is a shared commons of our ambitions, our dreams, our memories, our culture, and ourselves.”

But what do these places look like? Over the course of 18 years, Dawson found out. Inspired by “the long history of photographic survey projects,” he traveled thousands of miles and photographed hundreds of public libraries in nearly all 50 states. Looking at the photos, the conclusion is unavoidable: American libraries are as diverse as Americans. They’re large and small, old and new, urban and rural, and in poor and wealthy communities. Architecturally, they represent a range of styles, from the grand main branch of the New York Public Library to the humble trailer that serves as a library in Death Valley National Park, the hottest place on Earth. “Because they’re all locally funded, libraries reflect the communities they’re in,” Dawson said in an interview. “The diversity reflects who we are as a people.”

(Continue Reading)

a-massacre-of-corvines:

age-of-awakening:

 What angels are apparently supposed to look like according to

They had 6 wings, covered with eyes on the wings. And had two eyes on their face, but used 2 wings to cover their face at all times because if a mortal ever saw their face they would die.

 The bible mentions multiple faces, being covered in eyeballs, constant singing, lion heads etc.

 Besides being described as beasts and monsters, they’re practically brainless drones. Heavenly angels are only one step removed from demons. The only difference is demons fell from heaven because they chose to follow Lucifer, who was an angel (angel of music and one of god’s favorites). So they are these eyeball covered animal mashed up monsters who were only created to worship for eternity (part of humanities creation was so that something would choose to love god, not just worship him because they were created to).

Angels fall into a lot of new age and conspiracy beliefs.We were taught that the supernatural realms went in the order of Heaven, Hell, then Earth. So when the angels fell from heaven with Lucifer, some fell through hell and landed on Earth. We were taught they intermarried with early humans and created giants and taught witch craft to women.

Technically, angels have made their only moral choice, and so experience morality only in theory.
Some angel characters are based on the non-humanoid or vaguely humanoid “canon” angels, which can be anything from a ball of wings covered in eyes to a huge, living wheel to animals on fire.

 They’re abominations, they’re alien, they’re beyond us. They’re creatures that biology as we know it does not apply to. Often they do not love mankind, they love God and God alone.

Maybe angels taking on human form but describing just what they look like when they’re not wearing their skin.

Angels are such creepy and interesting.

The study of angelology is EVEN MORE interesting with a literal and scientific approach to understand what ancients have said regarding angelic deities. It’s a beautiful study

Wuhhhh

(Source: nospheratusblack666)

Explosive force Israel has dropped on Gaza comparable to Hiroshima atomic bomb

(Source: marxism-leninism-maoism)

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